Who's Who

As Rumer’s Story grows longer, we realise that keeping track of who is who is becoming more difficultindeed, since we’re using pseudonyms, we are having this problem ourselves.

To make things easier, see below for a list, which covers people, organisations, etc. mentioned in all parts of the website and will be added to as more are introduced.

Names/titles are arranged alphabetically (by surname where possible) within each category.

Hospitals

Central London Hospital (CLH)
The main adult hospital managed by Central London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, whose catchment area we fell within. Helen’s maternity care took place here and various functions such as the Clinical Ethics Committee were shared between CLH and other CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust hospitals.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Charlton University Hospital
Hospital that was floated as an option for a second opinion prenatally. Not managed by CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
London Paediatric Hospital (aka London Paeds)
Children’s hospital managed by Central London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Provided the vast majority of Rumer’s care, including Neonatology, Fetal and Paediatric Cardiology, Palliative Care, surgery, general ward treatment and intensive care.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Royal Children’s Hospital
Children’s hospital that was approached for a second opinion. Not managed by CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
St. Matthew’s Hospital
Second adult hospital managed by Central London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Some CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust functions were based here, notably Genetics.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 8
St. Sebastian’s Hospital (aka Seb’s)
Hospital that provided us with a second opinion prenatally. Not managed by CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
The Simms Hospital
Hospital that provided us with a second opinion prenatally. Not managed by CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Thames Hospital
The closest hospital to our home geographically, although not the one whose catchment area we fell within. An adult hospital that incorporated fairly comprehensive paediatric facilities, including a paediatric A&EA&EAccident & Emergency department, Neonatal UnitNeonatal UnitWard for newborn babies and PICUPICUPaediatric Intensive Care Unit. Not managed by CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2

Other Organisations

Charities
Bliss
Charity that aimed to improve neonatal care and support families in the UK. They oversaw a set of standards called the Bliss Baby Charter which our Neonatal Unit was working towards; we referred to this in our dispute with the unit regarding our reading Rumer’s medical notes.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Blue Skies Children’s Hospice

Children’s hospice whose catchment area we fell within. We were referred to them and visited the hospice during pregnancy. The main services of relevance to Rumer that they provided were:

  • Step-down carewhen a child with a life-limiting condition is discharged from hospital, it can be daunting for their family to adjust to managing all of their needs, especially when these include things like continuous feeding pumps, regular medications, oxygen and making judgements about infections to which they may be at particular risk. In this situation the hospice could act as a halfway house between hospital and home for a few days.
  • Respite carefamilies that were registered with the hospice receive an allocation of a certain number of days per year during which to take respite care. This can be arranged to suit the familyfor example, family could stay with the child in their room while hospice staff helped look after siblings, or family could stay in their own room with hospice staff caring for the child in order for them to have a break, or whatever arrangement suited.
  • Bereavement carewhen a child died, their body could be brought to the hospice where it would stay in a small bedroom with agressive air conditioning. Their parents would stay in a room very close by and be able to visit at any time. Hospice staff would cook, help make arrangements and otherwise care for the parents during the family’s stay. This arrangement could continue for up to a few days as a transition period for the child’s parents. This was the only element that we ended up being able to use for Rumer.

The hospice was a charity, receiving no NHS funding.

First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 5
Natural Death Centre
Charity that provided advice and information on processes around death and particularly things like burial in natural locations such as woodlands. We took advice from them about burying Rumer in our garden at home.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 15
Remember My Baby
Charity offering professional photography for the families of babies who die around the time of their birth. We approached them with a view to potentially using their service in the event that Rumer died at this time.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 14
Support Organisation For Trisomy 13/18 (SOFT UK)
Charity to support families affected by trisomies 13 (aka Patau’s Syndrome) and 18 (aka Edwards’ Syndrome). Not to be confused with the American charity with similar aims, SOFT. We contacted SOFT UK for advice while Helen was pregnant.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 15
Medical
Central London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (CLHT)
Organisation that managed the hospitals whose catchment areas we fell within and that provided the vast bulk of Helen’s and Rumer’s care: Central London Hospital, London Paediatric Hospital and St. Matthew’s Hospital. One of many such organisations that run groups of NHS hospitals and other services. Follow the link for more information on NHS Foundation Trusts.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
City Scans
Non-NHS ultrasound facility offering private scans. We went here for a couple of scans for use as mementos in case Rumer died before birth.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10
Hoskins Medical Centre
Our local GP surgery.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1
Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)
NHS service offering basic CBT which Helen used in early pregnancy.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 3
National Health Service (NHS)

The UK’s state-funded healthcare provider. It is something of an umbrella organisation, with much decision-making devolved to trusts that manage groups of hospitals. With a few exceptions such as (in England) prescription charges and dentistry, NHS services are free at the point of use: payment is entirely dealt with through taxation and people using the NHS don’t get involved; they’re not issued with bills or statements and generally don’t know how much the services cost. Whether this is a good thing or not is a hotly contested issue internationally, but the NHS is extremely popular in the UK.

Paid-for, or private, healthcareand even health insuranceare also available, and NHS doctors often offer their services privately on top of their NHS work.

First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Other
Doula UK
Organisation representing doulas in the UK.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 16

Units & Wards

Accident & Emergency (A&E)Central London Hospital
Emergency department at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital, covering both CLH and London PaedsLondon PaedsLondon Paediatric Hospital. Rumer was taken here by ambulance in respiratory distress shortly after being discharged from Blyton Ward.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Accident & Emergency (A&E)Thames Hospital
Emergency department at Thames Hospital. Incorporated a paediatric A&E, including an area for children who needed short-term observation to stay for up to 24 hours. Rumer was taken here by ambulance after she stopped breathing at home.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Antenatal Clinic
CLHCLHCentral London Hospital clinic at which general antenatal services were provided. We had a couple of meetings and classes here.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 11
Blyton Ward
General paediatric ward at London Paediatric Hospital. It was a large ward containing medical and surgical HDUsHDUAn intermediate level of care between that of a normal ward and intensive care as well as standard beds, both on the open ward and in single rooms known as cubicles. The ward was split into bays of around 48 beds each, some of which were from time to time reserved as respiratory bays in order to group patients with respiratory infections together, away from those with different issues.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Early Pregnancy Unit (EPU)
CLHCLHCentral London Hospital drop-in unit for problems in early pregnancy.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1
Fetal Cardiology Unit
Outpatient unit at London Paediatric Hospital providing echo scansEchocardiogramA specialised type of ultrasound scan looking in detail at the baby’s (or in this case the fetus’s) heart and cardiology prenatally.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Fetal Medicine Unit (FMU)

Outpatient unit at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital at which pregnancy screening and ongoing management of high-risk pregnancies took place. We had all of our scans here (apart for the private memento ones).

Fetal Medicine as a subject is a sub-specialism of Obstetrics. Consequnetly, the FMU had its own head (one of the consultants) but ultimately came under the Obstetrics department.

First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Neonatal Unit (NNU)

London Paediatric Hospital ward (but located on the CLHCLHCentral London Hospital site) for newborn babies in need of more-than-trivial medical treatment. It was split into three levels of care: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for the sickest babies, High Dependency Unit (HDU) as an intermediate stage and Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) for those with fewer needs. These were housed in multiple rooms of various sizes; one such room was designated as HDU on one side and SCBU on the other. The idea was that babies who entered at one of the higher levels progressed through the lower one(s) until they were ready to go home.

The NNU also housed a couple of rooming-in rooms that contained an adult double bed as well as the baby’s medical facilities; these were generally used for parents to have a night alone with their baby just before going home, with the nursing and medical staff within easy reach. Once discharged, babies would not be readmitted to the NNU should they need to return to hospital but would now fall under Paediatrics.

The NNU was also home to the Neonatal Community Team.

First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
The Oregon Suite
CLHCLHCentral London Hospital’s midwife-led birth centre. We had a number of meetings in the birthing rooms here.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 11
Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)

Unlike on their Neonatal Unit, under Paediatrics at London Paediatric Hospital, intensive care was separated out into a completely different unit from the normal ward and HDUHDUAn intermediate level of care between that of a normal ward and intensive care levels of care, with its own doctors, nurses and management.

PICU was a large open floor, divided into a few large bays. As on Blyton Ward, there were also a few side-rooms (cubicles) for those who were especially infectious, and children with similar infections were grouped together on the main floor. PICU took children of all ages, but during our time thereat least outside the cardiac baythe vast majority seemed to be babies.

First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Pregnancy Assessment Unit (PAU)
Drop-in unit at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital for problems in mid-to-late pregnancy (similar to the EPUEPUEarly Pregnancy Unit). We attended the PAU many times in later pregnancy for CTG monitoringCTG monitoringCardiotocographya form of prenatal monitoring whereby the baby’s heartrate and any tightening of the mother’s uterus is recorded over time as a graph, potentially giving an indication as to whether the baby is in (or approaching) distress to mitigate Rumer’s risk of stillbirth.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Radiology UnitCLH
This unit at Central London Hospital housed an MRI scanner which we made use of twice during Helen’s pregnancy.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5

Teams

Accurate Fetal Scanning Study (AFSS) Research Team
We participated in this study during Helen’s pregnancy, as facilitated by Claire Kennedy, a Fetal Medicine Unit junior doctorJunior DoctorA doctor who has not yet attained the rank of consultant. Covers a wide range of grades, from Foundation Year doctors in their first couple of years after leaving medical school up to Senior Registrars who have considerable autonomy and their own training responsibilities. Junior doctors move between training positions on a regular basis, often to different hospitals and even different parts of the country. who was also part of this team.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5
Bereavement midwife team
A small team at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital comprising at first two midwives (but reduced to one during the course of the pregnancy) who planned and managed arrangements for stillbirths and neonatal deaths.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Clinical Ethics Committee (CEC)
A team that met both regularly and on an ad-hoc basis in order to discuss and make recommendations about ethical issues that arose in the clinical practice of any part of CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Members included CLHT and external clinicians, a legal and medical ethics advisor and a lay member. Not all members attended every meeting. Part of the committee met in July 2015 in order to discuss Rumer’s case.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Dale Team
Central London Hospital caseload midwifery team that covered the area we live in. The team worked mainly in the community, with most appointments taking place at home.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Neonatal Community Team
A team of London Paediatric Hospital nurses based in the Neonatal Unit who managed the transition home for babies discharged from the NNUNNUNeonatal Unit. The team liaised with other clinicians and with us prior to Rumer’s discharge from the NNU, visited us at home and continued to assist after her admittance to Paediatrics.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
Paediatric Palliative Care Team
A small team at London Paediatric Hospital comprising a part-time consultantConsultantA doctor who has completed their training. Unlike junior doctors, consultants are generally employed in permanent positions. Consultants are responsible for care given by junior doctors as well as their own, and it is common for patientsparticularly those with complex needsto be allocated a named consultant to manage their needs on a longer-term basis. and one or two specialist nurses. The team’s intended role was often somewhat unclear to us, but broadly their remit was to manage the palliative care needs of children with life-limiting conditionsLife-limiting conditionA condition which is expected to shorten a person’s life compared to what might be expected if they did not have the condition and their familiesfor example, by serving as a link between the hospital and the local children’s hospice. They became involved during Helen’s pregnancy after we received Rumer’s trisomy 18 diagnosis.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Steeple Team
Central London Hospitalbased midwifery team that dealt with women with high-risk pregnancies.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4

Departments

Complaints
Managed complaints about CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
General Paediatrics
London Paediatric Hospital department that was the main port of call for children under the hospital’s care (apart from neonatesNeonateA baby in their first month of life. Neonates were cared for by the Neonatal Unit (who would hang on to babies even beyond their time as a neonate, until they were first discharged from hospital). and that co-ordinated with specialist departments (such as Paediatric Cardiology) where necessary.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Genetics
CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust department based at St. Matthew’s Hospital dealing with the investigation and diagnosis of, and guidance about, conditions suspected to have a genetic link. They became involved during Helen’s pregnancy when we sought guidance while deciding whether to have an amniocentesisAmniocentesisProcedure whereby a sample of amniotic fluid is removed for diagnostic testing. Carries a low risk of miscarriage..
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 7 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Information Governance
CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust department managing control of and access to documents and other information held by the trust, including Subject Access Requests and Freedom of Information requests.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part [[part no]] and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2
It is not clear to us from information in the public domain what the precise arrangements were, but we assume there was a CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust department that advised clinicians and managers within the trust about issues that arose in clinical practice, both on a routine and emergency basis. Presumably, when these issues progressed to higher-level procedures such as a court case, what we are calling the Legal Department also arranged legal representation for the trust and, perhaps, its staff.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Midwifery

CLHCLHCentral London Hospital department that managed all the midwives. Under the UK system, midwives were clinical members of hospital staff. Women with uncomplicated pregnancies may never see a doctor, with all clinical actions performed by midwives, from the first booking appointment right through to postnatal checks.

Midwives spanned a number of grades and roles and were generally organised either into midwifery teams or by the department in which they worked. The main groups of midwives that were involved in our case are as follows:

  • Dale Team the team that covered the area in which we lived. Dale Team was a caseload team, meaning that women would be assigned a particular midwife who would see them for most or all antenatal appointments, would hopefully be the main midwife at the birth (if not, it would be another midwife from the team), and would perform postnatal checks and finally discharge the woman from midwifery care.
  • Steeple Team a specialist team looking after women with high-risk pregnancies.
  • Fetal Medicine midwives midwives who worked in the Fetal Medicine Unit. For our case at least, the role here seemed to be primarily administrative: midwives would sit in on consultant appointments and make arrangements with us and with other departments. One also assisted clinically during the amniocentesis.
  • Bereavement midwives a small team of midwives who specialised in arrangements for stillbirths and neonatal deaths.
  • Pregnancy Assessment Unit midwives although doctors often reviewed women and performed procedures in the PAUPAUPregnancy Assessment Unit, the unit was run by midwives, who would book attendees in, triage them, undertake assessment, monitoring and the like and finally admit or discharge them. They only referred to doctors when necessary.
  • Consultant Midwives the hospital had a few senior midwives of this grade who dealt with cases that were particularly difficult for one reason or another alongside the midwives from the woman’s existing midwifery team. Khushi Holloway became closely involved with our case after we received Rumer’s trisomy 18 diagnosis.
  • Antenatal WardAntenatal Ward and Postnatal WardPostnatal Ward midwives these midwives performed a similar role to that of nurses on a general ward.
  • Labour WardLabour Ward and The Oregon Suite midwives midwives here would manage women in labour and deliver babies. On The Oregon Suite, this would be entirely without doctors; on Labour Ward doctors would become involved when necessary.

The one place where you might expect midwives but there were none was the Early Pregnancy Unit, which was staffed by gynaecology nurses instead.

First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 1 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 1
Obstetrics
CLHCLHCentral London Hospital department that managed the medical (and, if necessary, surgical) care of pregnant women. Not every pregnant woman had an obstetricianthose without risk factors were usually directly cared for by midwives alonebut those with more complex pregnancies would have a named obstetrician throughout their pregnancy, and there would be obstetricians in charge of (and available on) the antenatal, labour and postnatal wards.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Paediatric Cardiac Surgery
London Paediatric Hospital department that carried out children’s heart surgery. Cardiologists (from the Fetal/Paediatric Cardiology departments) were the first port of call for children with heart problems; cardiac surgeons only became openly involved when surgery was being planned (or at least discussed)we never met one.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Paediatric Cardiology
London Paediatric Hospital department of cardiologists who managed children’s heart conditions after birth. Decisions about surgery were made jointly by the cardiologists and cardiac surgeons.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Paediatric Surgery
London Paediatric Hospital department comprising surgeons who performed general surgeries on children. If Rumer had a CDHCDHCongenital Diaphragmatic Herniaa hole in the diaphragm that allows the contents of the abdomen to migrate into the chest area, restricting lung development before birth. During pregnancy it was thought that Rumer may have a CDH, which (if so) may have required surgery after birth if she was to survive. that required surgery, it would have been this department’s surgeons that would be involved; in the event, they carried out the surgery that placed her g-tubeG-tubeGastrostomy tubea feeding tube that is routed directly into the stomach through the skin.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS)
CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust department with a public-facing desk at each site offering advice to patients about things such as making a complaint, as well serving as a conduit for patients to communicate with hospital staff if they are unable to do so directly for any reason. A standard service available at all NHS hospitals.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2

Midwives

Billy
Midwife who taught the Central London Hospital general antenatal class that we attended.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 11
Teresa Clover
During Helen’s pregnancy, Steeple Team’s lead midwifeZainab Gurneyleft. Teresa Clover was her replacement. We met her once or twice and she was involved during the pregnancy behind the scenes.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Elysia Crouch
Fetal Medicine midwife at Central London Hospital. She acted as our link to the Fetal Medicine Unit.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 9 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Rosa Deacon
Bereavement midwife at Central London Hospital. She left the hospital before the end of the pregnancy.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10
Mollie Evans
Dale Team caseload midwife from Central London Hospital. As our named midwife, the idea was that we would see Mollie for most midwife appointments; she would co-ordinate our midwifery care and she or another member of her team would hopefully be at Rumer’s birth.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Grace
Dale Team caseload midwife from Central London Hospital.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2
Zainab Gurney
Central London Hospital midwife in charge of Steeple Team. She left the team before the end of the pregnancy and was replaced by Teresa Clover.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 11 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Khushi Holloway
Central London Hospital Consultant Midwife who ended up dealing with the pregnancy closely alongside Mollie Evans.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Lenna Ralls
Dale Team’s lead midwife.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Ophelia Somers
Central London Hospital midwife who worked in the Fetal Medicine Unit and Pregnancy Assessment Unit; we saw her on various occasions in both.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 18

Obstetrics & Fetal Medicine

Clayton Conroy
Consultant obstetrician at Central London Hospital.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2
George Donnachie
Fetal Medicine consultant at Central London Hospital. He saw us for most of our scans and ended up also taking over the role of being our link obstetrician from Jody Ellis.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Jody Ellis
Central London Hospital consultant obstetrician from the clinic that covered Dale Team’s area. She was initially our link obstetrician.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 2
Hero Flavell
Obstetric consultant and Head of Obstetrics at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital. We didn’t have any direct contact with her during Rumer’s life (or Helen’s pregnancy with her).
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Claire Kennedy
Fetal Medicine junior doctor from Central London Hospital who participated in many of the appointments with George Donnachie. She was also involved in fetal MRI scans and a research project that we took part in.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 4

Fetal & Paediatric Cardiology

Dr Cook
London Paediatric Hospital junior doctor who we saw for Rumer’s first fetal echos.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5
Evan Marshall
Fetal Cardiology professor at London Paediatric Hospital. Rumer’s link cardiology consultant prenatally.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 5 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
June Winter
London Paediatric Hospital Cardiac Liaison Nurse. She acted as our link to Fetal Cardiology.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 6 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4

Genetics

Miray McClellan
Genetics consultant at St. Matthew’s Hospital. We saw her at our first Genetics appointment, before receiving the trisomy 18 diagnosis.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 8

Neonatal Unit

Daenerys Asprey
One of the London Paediatric Hospital Neonatal consultants. She acted as a kind of second named consultant for Rumer during her time on the Neonatal Unit, managing some aspects of her care behind the scenes and liaising with us when she was around but Yehuda Hamnett wasn’t.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Charan Bateman
One of the Neonatal consultants at London Paediatric Hospital. If we remember correctly, he was a locum consultantLocum ConsultantA consultant who is employed on a short-term basis, for example to cover sickness or temporary vacancies.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Daisy-Ann Bergin
One of the Neonatal consultants at London Paediatric Hospital.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Abriella Burlton
Neonatal consultant equivalent at London Paediatric Hospitalher job title wasn’t that of consultant, but she seemed to be treated as one within the unit. She was generally in charge of the SCBUSCBUSpecial Care Baby Unitthe lowest of three levels of care within the Neonatal Unit and she played a major part in managing the issue around our reading Rumer’s hospital notes, hosting a number of meetings with us.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Sean Charlwood
One of the Neonatal consultants at London Paediatric Hospital; he ran the Neonatal Unit’s parents’ group (a regular meeting of parents on the unit for social support). He was also a member of the Clinical Ethics Committee.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Jessie Gallo
One of the Neonatal consultants at London Paediatric Hospital. He was initially going to be the Neonatal consultant we met prenatally, and would therefore have become Rumer’s named consultant, but because of a scheduling conflict this was handed over to Ida Leigh.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Rodney Greenlaw
Neonatal consultant and Clinical DirectorClinical DirectorSenior doctormanager in charge of the clinical delivery of a particular part of a hospital’s services; the level above head of department. for Children’s Medicine and Neonatology at London Paediatric Hospital.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Yehuda Hamnett
Neonatal consultant at London Paediatric Hospital. He was present at the Clinical Ethics Committee meeting called to discuss Rumer’s case prenatally and subsequently became her named consultant after we requested a change from Ida Leigh.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Ida Leigh
Neonatal consultant at London Paediatric Hospital. Initially Rumer’s named consultant.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 19 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Clement Stuart
London Paediatric Hospital Neonatal consultant and Head of the Neonatal Unit. Our first contact with him was when we emailed him to request a change of named consultant after our first two meetings prenatally; he remained in touch with us from that point forward.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4

Palliative Care

Tegan Blackman
Paediatric Palliative Care consultant at London Paediatric Hospital.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 19 and Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 3
Jessica Duncalfe
Paediatric Palliative Care nurse from London Paediatric Hospital who usually accompanied Tegan Blackman.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 19

Hospital/Trust StaffOther

Estelle Lawlor
There was a change of Chief Executive at CLHTCLHTCentral London Hospital NHS Foundation Trust during Rumer’s life. Estelle Lawlor was the incoming Chief Executive, to whom we submitted our complaint. She replaced [[Pseudonym]].
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 2

Doulas

Nelly Lister
Pregnancy yoga teacher who was local to us. She also worked as a doula and ended up co-ordinating the complex doula arrangements for our situation.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 3

Miscellaneous

Ignas Boyton
Doctor at Royal Children’s Hospital, presumably a Neonatal consultant. He was floated as a potential source for a second opinion for Neonatology by Ida Leigh prenatally, but this was not taken forward.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Keilan Godwin
Gynaecology consultant at CLHCLHCentral London Hospital and Clinical DirectorClinical DirectorSenior doctormanager in charge of the clinical delivery of a particular part of a hospital’s services; the level above head of department. for Women’s Services, covering Obstetrics, Fetal Medicine and Midwifery. We didn’t have any direct contact with him.
First mentioned in Complaint about Rumer’s care, part 4
Melech Kladivo
SOFT UK representative who responded to our request for help during Helen’s pregnancy.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 15
Paula
City Scans sonographer who undertook our first private memento scan as well as Helen’s ovulation scans prior to conception.
First mentioned in Rumer’s Story, part 10